Witches Black Salt – Infusing the Power of Herbs

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This article is about Witches Black Salt, also known as ritual black salt.  It is not about any of the different culinary types of salt available today.  Witches Black salt is not for human consumption. It is not to be used in any type of food preparation or for seasoning anything that will be eaten by a human being or animal.  Eating it, even in small amounts, can be harmful to your health.  So, if you are looking for a cooking tip, this isn’t the article you’re looking for.  But, if you are looking to learn about and possibly make your own ritual black salt, then read on friends…read on.

Also, before reading further, understand that when it comes to making Witches Black Salt there is no ‘official’ recipe, nor is there an ‘official’ process for preparation.  There is no right or wrong way.  Some Witches with an agenda may claim otherwise, stating that any recipe or technique other than the one they are promoting, ‘is not the right way’.   Don’t be fooled, trust your instincts and remember that the only key ingredients are salt and intention; the magick comes from the maker.

Witches Black Salt

Black Salt for Protection and More

Of all the items available for practicing witches, ritual salt is one of the easiest to obtain/craft.  It’s also one of the most effective tools in the witch’s collection of magickal items.  Salt has been used for centuries in magickal activities because it naturally absorbs negative energy.

The most common way to use witch’s black salt is for protection.  Some people will pour a line of salt across the threshold of doors and along windowsills, others will surround their entire property or dwellings. This practice is done to keep negativity from entering your house; something we all can see value in.  It can also be used to form a protective circle for all types of rituals.  Many witches will pour a line around their entire property annually.  This practice, when used along with other protective elements, creates another layer against harmful energies.  (If you intend to do this, it takes about a pound of salt to do the edge of a standard city lot.  My lot is about one-third of an acre and it takes nearly two pounds to do the edge).

It also is used as a general shield against negativity.  If you throw a handful in the direction from which something wicked is coming, it will block the negativity.  Open your front door and say the person’s name who you don’t want to come to your house again while throwing a handful of the salt at the same time.  Make a car charm and fill it with black salt to keep the negative energy of the road our of your space.  Put some in a glass bowl and keep it under your bed to dispel nightmares or things that go bump in the night.

If you mix it with water, you can spray the darkened corners of your rooms. This will banish the little bits of bad energy that may be hiding there.  Spray the finger, hand, or footprints of someone who is trying to do your harm for your own protection.  It can also be used for breaking hexes and curses.  It is also used to charge magickal items, stones and other tools.

Take the Time to Do it Right

There are those souls who have been overly influenced by modernism.  Everything they do seems to be at breakneck pace as if an invisible clock was hovering before their eyes.  They rush through rituals, speed walk through the forest, and often try to find shortcuts when preparing recipes or when doing spell-work.  Don’t be one of those people, especially when it comes to making witch’s black salt.  For this process, time is your friend.  Be prepared to enjoy each other’s company for an evening.

I’ve been making ritual salt for longer than I can remember, and up until now have been a bit reluctant to publish my recipe and process.  That reluctance hasn’t come from fear of being judged or criticized either.  It is because making ritual salt is a very personal thing to me.  I take the creation of each batch of my own witch’s black salt quite seriously; after all, I’ll be the one using it and it must meet my needs with exacting standards.  I would expect the same from anyone else.

If you’ve been searching the internet for recipes, you will find this one somewhat different, but amazing nonetheless.  This recipe does not require you to scrape your cauldron or add charcoal.  The finished product will be lighter in color than some other recipes (you may add those extra steps should you desire a darker finished product).

The Preparation

When you are making a batch of witch’s black salt for protection, first gather as many protective herbs as you can get your hands on.  There is a link at the very end of this article that can help you identify the magickal properties of herbs.  If you can, use ones from your garden or property as they will be the most potent for protecting their living space as well as yours.  We grow more than seventy different herbs on our property, and have access to dozens more on the surrounding land; just as you’d expect from a family of witches.  If you follow the old ways and use the moon as your gardening guide, harvest your herbs a few days after the full moon when the sap is high, but the energy has started turning downward – they will easier to dry and be in great condition the following full moon for use in this recipe.  If you’ve already collected and dried your herbs, then you can jump right into the actual production process.

Also if you plan on using a cauldron or other cast iron pot, consider what it has been used for in the past.  Certain spell-work can leave residuals in the cauldron that you may not want creeping into this recipe, regardless of how little remains.  I use a large cast iron dutch oven cooking pot for making ritual salt.  I bought it specifically for this purpose many years ago, and that’s all it will ever be used for.  In some ways it’s like the family cooking pot from the Colonial days.  It was never fully emptied and never washed, so that the goodness of generations worth of food would be included in every meal thereafter.  Once you are finished, store your cast iron in a dry place so that it doesn’t rust.

I also have a portable fire pit that I use to burn large quantities of dried herbs in.  Since most of them have a vent hole in the bottom, make sure you put something under it to catch anything that falls through.  I use the lid of my pot (as you can see in the above picture).

The Recipe

I will only make ritual salt on a peak full moon night and outside; no exceptions for any reason.  It’s a waste of your time to use the most potent ingredients and then prepare the mix on a day of weak lunar energy.

Cauldron or Cast Iron Pot (I have a large Dutch Oven for making black salt and that’s all it is used for)
Brazier or portable fire-pit (also only used for making black salt to keep it pure)
Assortment of dried herbs, roots, and flowers (your choosing, but they need to be dry)
Coarse Sea Salt (sift through it and break up any clumps before starting)
Essential oils (your choosing, but do some research to make sure they fit your plans)

Do not use table salt as it contains iodine.

The Process

I like to wait until the moon is visible in the sky, so the energy can flow freely.  The first thing is to cast a circle around your work space (so be sure you have everything gathered and close by).  Say the prayers or incantations that are appropriate to your beliefs until you are relaxed and focused on the task at hand.  Remember that this process is about intention.  Clear your mind of everything except what you want to achieve.  If you are seeking protection, then keep a focus on it and do not deviate from it.

Pile your herbs in the fire pit or container you wish to burn them in (I won’t go into fire safety, but to say, be safe).  Light the pile and stir it until everything is completely burned away.  This can take some time if you are using roots or thicker stemmed items, so be patient and enjoy the fire.  If you are making a very large batch, it makes sense to keep some on the side and add as the pile burns down or your air flow will be limited and things won’t burn away completely.   I use a thick oak dowel to stir my herbs while they burn.

When your fire is out and nothing but ash remains, carefully transfer it to your cauldron or cast iron pot.  Add a small amount of coarse salt and begin mixing; you may have some dust so don’t put your face too close.  Once the dust settles, add any essential oils you wish to add, taking care not to add too much (a few drops seem sufficient and won’t cause things to gum up).  Using your oak dowel as a pestle and the cast iron as your mortar, apply more pressure to break up the salt slightly while simultaneously infusing the herb ashes into it.  Add more salt as needed until you have a nice color and consistency.  I often chant, sing, or meditate during this state of the process.  The grinding and stirring are methodical and magickal; you can literally feel the lunar energy coming down and entering the mix.

You’ll know when it is done.  Your senses will feel the moment of completion and that is it.  Don’t over-add salt as it will make your salt look overly grey and less powerful.

Closing Your Circle

Some people like to pray or sing over the completed batch, while others are ready to move on to other things.  When you are ready, close your circle, clean up and store your salt in a glass jar or wood container.  Metal or plastic aren’t recommended for obvious reasons.  Don’t store the salt in your cast iron as it will cause corrosion eventually and your salt will clump.

Additional Reading

Some articles that you might find interesting for this process and in many other magickal applications.

The Spiritual Power Of Salt: Protecting From Negative Energy

Identifying Iron Nails in a Sea of Steel

Magickal Properties of Herbs, Nuts, and Branches used in Spellwork

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1 Comment

  • Reminds me of the recipe for gunpowder. In fact I bet black powder could be substituted in a pinch. Potassium nitrate is still chemically a salt, isn’t it?

    What if you added a little flowers of sulphur to your recipe? I bet that would increase it’s potency.

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